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If you picked “mid-2015” in your office pool for the date the FCC’s incentive spectrum auction would be held, we’ve got some bad news for you. While that was probably a pretty good bet up to now (since Commission officials have tenaciously stuck with the “mid-2015” date for some time), it’s not looking so good anymore. According to an item just posted on the FCC’s blog, the current target date is “early 2016”. Gary Epstein, Chair of the Commission’s Spectrum Auction Task Force, alluding to “undeniable impediments” in the auction’s path, has this to say: As Chairman Wheeler indicated several weeks ago,...
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High on the superstar's wish list: Increased video description services. Yes, you heard it right! Stevie Wonder, the legendary songwriter and recording artist, made the rounds, live and in person, at the FCC recently. He met with the Chairman and the other four Commissioners to advocate for greater availability of audio description services to provide better access for the blind to television programming. Mr. Wonder noted that he can go to his choice of movies in many theaters today and get a headset that delivers video description; but when the same movies are shown on television, the video description is absent....
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The clock is running down for the FCC’s sports blackout rules. The two-minute warning (actually, the 31-day warning) has been whistled. As pretty much everybody expected, the Commission abolished its blackout rules late last month. That action is now set to take effect on November 24, 2014, according to a notice in the Federal Register. Despite an aggressive defense mounted by the NAB and various sports leagues (including, most notably, the NFL), the Commission punted on the rules because they believed the rules were no longer necessary to ensure that sporting events remain widely available on television. Instead, the FCC was content to...
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More from our "Mother May I" file We have reported regularly on the plight of an applicant who has been denied 14 times in his efforts to get the FCC to grant the same two sets of applications. Given our previous attention to this, we would be remiss if we didn’t update our readers on the latest, if perhaps unsurprising, development: the applicant’s 15th try has been denied. As readers may recall, after the 11th adverse ruling, the FCC forbade this particularly persistent party from again asking for reconsideration without first getting the Commission’s permission. That, of course, led to three more...
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In late September we reported on the FCC’s request for comments about its proposed “TV Broadcaster Relocation Fund Reimbursement Form”. That’s the form that the Commission plans to use when, after the incentive spectrum auctions, TV licensees put pen to paper and figure out what it’s going to cost to move to their repacked facilities. Many (if not most) licensees will then be looking to Uncle Sam to cover those costs – and the Reimbursement Form (and related procedures described in the draft instructions to the form) will provide those licensees the access to the cash. In other words, the...
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Some rules relaxed while measures added to prevent interference to wireless networks  Back in early 2013, the FCC took steps to help consumers deal with the dreaded cell phone phenomenon of dead spots by allowing the use of private signal boosters. (Readers should recall that boosters receive and re-transmit cell phone signals to improve coverage in their immediate vicinity.) And now, underscoring its interest in encouraging such devices, the Commission has tweaked its rules. But be forewarned, the tweaks are highly technical and unless you’re deeply involved in the manufacturing side of the booster universe, you shouldn’t expect to notice...
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With SuperPAC money flowing and political ads running on Internet streams, caution in dealing with political spots is in order. There may be just a few weeks remaining in this election season, but broadcasters should be paying attention – now and in future elections – to an important aspect of the political advertising business: the extent to which they may be able to demand changes in, or refuse to air, political ads because of their content. One key protection that covers the broadcast of some political spots does not cover all such spots, and it definitely does not appear to cover...
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Even though October 1 – and the triennial election between must-carry and retransmission consent that had to be made by then – may be fading in our rear views, TV licensees and cable operators still have much to think about. Tying down the details of the retrans deal is an important project for anyone who chose that route. And for those on the must-carry side, there are a slew of practical considerations about which to be aware: for example, TV stations should be up on how must-carry elections can be enforced; and both cable operators and TV stations should be...
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RECCO asks FCC for waiver of Location and Monitoring Service rules. The Location and Monitoring Service (LMS), a somewhat obscure service nestled in Subpart M to Part 90 of the FCC’s rules, is back in the news. This could be of considerable interest to you if you’re a skier who prefers avalanche-prone slopes. LMS was originally envisioned as a service enabling fleet operators to pinpoint the locations of their vehicles around a city. That was 20 years ago. Since then, GPS has provided a more accurate, more cost effective alternative, leaving LMS without much of a market. In 2006, a company called...
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Slowly but surely, the new set of rigorous requirements for 911 system service providers adopted last December in the wake of the 2012 “derecho” storm are coming on line. Most of those requirements took effect in February, but four particular rules did not. That’s because they involve “information collections” that had to be run past the Office of Management and Budget thanks to the Paperwork Reduction Act. OMB’s review process has now been wrapped up for three of the four – those would be Sections 12.4(c), 12.4(d)(1) and 12.4(d)(3) – and they have now taken effect, according to a notice in...
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FCC finally begins to address what post-repack life might look like for LPTVs and TV translators – but it presents more questions than answers. Of all television operators, LPTV and TV translator licensees have faced the greatest uncertainties as the anticipated repacking of the TV band has begun to loom. That’s because the FCC’s repacking plans thus far have disregarded LPTVs and translators. As a result, LPTV/translator licensees don’t whether their stations will continue to exist post-repack: the repacking process will squeeze full-power and Class A stations into considerably less spectrum than they currently occupy, leaving precious little extra space for...
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The steady shrinkage of the TV bands is forcing the FCC to look elsewhere for wireless microphone spectrum. Having inadvertently threatened a key industry with extinction, the FCC is now trying to reactivate it. We see wireless microphones used on TV stages, live concerts, and in Broadway and Las Vegas shows. TV and film studios use technically similar equipment. So do backstage personnel for intercom and cueing in all of the above productions. Other uses for wireless microphones include public meetings, political events, school and college classrooms, and live music in bars, garage-band garages, and just about everywhere else. For decades, wireless microphones...
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